Food For Thought

entrata cafe-greco

With a double article about the history of books in this issue’s “Of Books, Art, and People,” what more appropriate time to suggest a visit to Rome’s Caffè Greco! Here for more than 200 years the great minds of art, literature, and music have been meeting around its tiny, marble-topped tables. The café was opened […]

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Food For Thought

semplice-ma-di-qualita

During the Middle Ages, Campo de’ Fiori (“Field of Flowers”), today Rome’s oldest open-air fruit-and-vegetable market, was the commercial and touristic center of the city as well as the site of public executions. The most notorious was that of the Dominican poet, philosopher, mathematician and astrologer Giordano Bruno, burned at the stake in 1600. Bruno’s […]

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Food For Thought

antipasti 20

We all know that “Rome wasn’t built in a day.” Indeed, Rome is a layer-cake of history built on seven hills, and it is appropriately nicknamed “The Eternal City” because visitors can see monuments and art from almost every period of her c. 2,700-year history: Ancient Greek, Republican Rome, Imperial Rome, Medieval (if not so […]

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Food For Thought

febr 013

When I first arrived in Rome in 1972 as a young bride, there were no ethnic restaurants except French “Charlie’s Saucerie” between the Colosseum and St. John Lateran, Japanese “Hamasei” near Piazza di Spagna, and the “Cantina Tirolese” near St. Peter’s, a favorite with Cardinal Ratzinger before he was elected Pope. All three are still […]

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Food For Thought

Salerno Roll_ME GEISHA

At the time of this writing, a month after its opening, “Me Geisha,” founded by Italian-American businessman Giuseppe Tuosto two years after his successful restaurant with the same name at Via Roma 59 in Salerno, is probably still Rome’s newest restaurant. Just off Corso Vittorio Emanuele II, next door to the Chiesa Nuova, 500 meters […]

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Food For Thought

febr 013

Panettone translates as “a large loaf of bread.” Actually, it’s a large sweet bready cake with various creamy fillings, raisins and candied fruits; its dome is covered with toppings of different flavors. Panettone’s origins probably date back to the Roman Empire: ancient Romans sweetened a type of leavened cake with honey. During the Renaissance, it […]

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Food For Thought

aldo fabrizi prete

Roman to the core, Aldo Fabrizi (1905-1990) was an Italian actor, director, screenwriter, and comedian, best known for his role as the heroic priest in Roberto Rossellini’s Rome, Open City and as a partner of the Neapolitan actor Totò in a number of successful comedies. Aldo’s exuberant younger sister, Elena, known as “Lella,” also had […]

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Via Monte Del Gallo

St Peter's railroad station with convenient connections to Rome's beaches or to Rome's main railroad station and subway system.

For many years, Friar Tuck and I were neighbors on Via Monte del Gallo, a narrow, quiet, residential street, which winds uphill from the Italian State Railway’s St. Peter’s station at the beginning of Via Greg­orio VII to the Vatican-owned, spartan, rabbit-warren hotel Casa Tra Noi (www.hotelcasatranoiroma.com). With its ample parking lot for buses and […]

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Food For Thought

Naples, Italy.

Although pizza was almost certainly born more than 3,000 years ago in ancient Egypt, it’s the single food most firmly associated with Italy, and particularly with Nap­les. The first documented pizzas were eaten in ancient Pompeii and Herculaneum, where archaeologists have uncovered brick pizza ovens. But it was pizza without mozzarella and tomatoes, which were […]

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Heinz Beck – Rome’s only chef with three Michelin stars

Heinz Beck.

In 1993 Hans Fritz, the German director of Rome’s Cavalieri Hilton, asked Heinz Winkler, the chef, restaurateur/owner of “Tan­tris,” the only Munich restaurant with three Michelin stars (and still today the owner of the three-starred “Residenz Heinz Winkler” in Aschau), to recommend a talented protégé to become Executive Chef for a still-to-open Hilton rooftop restaurant. Job […]

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Food for thought – Hotel Michelangelo

MIchelangelo_Roma_Exterior-view2

Built in 1959 for the 1960 Summer Olympics held in Rome, 4-star Hotel Michelangelo (Via della Stazione di San Pietro 14), like “La Vittoria” and “Il Cantico” (reviewed in the previous two issues of Inside the Vatican) is on the Trastevere side of St. Peter’s Square, directly across the wide street, Via della Porta Cavalleggeri, […]

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Il Cantico – A welcoming oasis in Rome

Le caremelle di pasta

Opened on October 4, 2012 “Il Cantico” (www.ilcantico.it) is probably the newest hotel in the area on the via Gregorio VII-Trastevere side of St. Peter’s Basilica. Located on a quiet residential side street at Via del Cottolegno 50, it’s five city blocks from “La Vittoria” and St. Peter’s Square — a 10-minute walk or three […]

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Pope Francis’s favorite dish

Pope Francis is pictured cooking in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in an undated file photo.

Surrounded on three sides by the Alps including Monviso where the Po River rises, Piemonte or Piedmont is a region of northwest Italy, bordered on the west by France, on the east by Lombardy, on the north by Val D’Aosta and Switzerland, and on the south by Liguria and a very small fragment of Emilia […]

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Food for Thought

Claudio Di Bartolomeo and his tall son, Leonardo.

Opened in 1919, less than a year after the World War I armistice with Italy on the winning side, La Vittoria (“The Victory”) at Via delle Fornaci 15, is the oldest restaurant on the Trastevere/Janiculum side of Vatican City (to the left as one looks toward the facade of St. Peter’s). “At first it was […]

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A Restaurant and a Bed and Breakfast near the Basilica of St. John in Lateran

Stefano and Jenny, the managers of the Taverna Latina, say: “Very often the things that give us greatest satisfaction are those pleasantly unexpected. The pleasure of discovery we leave to our new customers, because our habitual clients know our place well; those who find us never leave us.” The Taverna Latina is situated beyond the […]

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A Trip to Ceri, Near Rome, with a Charming B&B and a Special Restaurant

Heading north from Rome, leaving the shores of the Tyrrhenian Sea, on an outcrop of volcanic tufa is the medieval village of Ceri. A ring of crenelated walls surrounds the ancient dwellings, the Church of Mary Immaculate, a place of pilgrimage, and the Torlonia Palace, all facing the village square. Ceri is an ideal starting […]

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